Xbox One emulators

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Xbox One
Xbox-One.png
Developer Microsoft
Type Home video game console
Generation Eighth generation
Release date 2013
Discontinued 2020
Predecessor Xbox 360
Successor Xbox One X & S
Emulated
For emulators that run on the Xbox One, see Emulators on Xbox One.


The Xbox One is an eighth-generation home video game console produced by Microsoft on November 22, 2013, and was retailed for $499. It had an AMD 8-core APU at 1.75 GHz and 8 gigabytes of RAM. It has an AMD GPU on the AMD Radeon GCN architecture. Early in its life, it was heavily criticized for intrusive DRM, such as always-online and lack of used game sharing. These have since been removed. Notably, this console runs on the x86 architecture with a modified Windows OS, so it's essentially a watered-down PC.

Emulators[edit]

THERE ARE CURRENTLY NO EMULATORS FOR THIS DEVICE THAT CAN RUN COMMERCIAL GAMES AND/OR SOFTWARE.

Compatibility layers (...)[edit]

Name Platform(s) Latest Version One X/S Hardware features
and peripherals
Enhancements Compatibility FLOSS Active Recommended
PC
XBONEmu Windows git N/A ?

Native[edit]

Name Latest Version One X/S Hardware features
and peripherals
Enhancements Compatibility FLOSS Active Recommended
Console
Xbox Series X/S Patch based ~ 99%[N 1]
Xbox One X & S Patch based Native ~ 100%
  1. Kinect games are incompatible. See #Hardware features and peripherals.

Comparisons[edit]

Emulators

N/A

Compatibility layers
XBONEmu
XBONEmu is a compatibility layer but this is still in early development and will not work until Xbox One games have been fully dumped, decrypted and tested. It should also be noted that the developer states that the emulator is only made for XDK apps, not retail games.
Native
Xbox Series X/S and Xbox One X/S
Since Xbox One and later, Microsoft consoles utilize a cut-down version of Windows, they can all natively run backwards compatible games. However, games made before 2015 are running legacy Windows 8 games which are different to Windows 10 onwards, Microsoft probably made compatibility layers or updated games to the new Windows 10 platform.

Enhancements[edit]

Name Xbox Series X/S
Xbox One X/S
Graphics Resizable Internal Resolution [N2 1]
Texture Replacement
Ultrawide hack
Widescreen already supported on Xbox One system.
But there is no support by system for render games in other ratios such as ultrawide 21:9 or super ultrawide 32:9.
Ray-tracing
(DXR, VRT and MRT)
Implementing ray-tracing in an emulator is unfortunately quite challenging and unlikely to be feasible in the near future.
However you can try "Screen-Space Ray Traced Global Illumination" shader using ReShade.
Pre-rendering AA
(MSAA, SSAA)
Super-resolution techniques
(DLSS, XeSS and FSR 2+)
Requires access to the depth buffer and temporal data like motion-vectors so it's quite challenging and unlikely to be feasible in the near future.
RTX Remix Implementing RTX Remix technology in an emulator is unfortunately quite challenging and unlikely to be feasible in the near future.
Performance Internal Framerate Hack [N2 1]
Frame generation technologies
(LSFG, DLSS-G, ExtraSS and AFMF)
Implementing frame generation technology in an emulator is unfortunately quite challenging and unlikely to be feasible in the near future, however post-processing techniques such as motion interpolation is quite possible. Input latency will be a crucial factor, but its impact likely varies depending on the specific technique employed, it's recommended to use after applying the "Internal Framerate Hack".
Rendering latency reduction technologies
(LatencyFleX, Reflex and Anti-Lag+)
While most emulators offer frame pacing or framebuffer latency control options, implementing rendering latency reduction technologies isn't currently feasible. This is likely doesn't offer enough benefit to justify the development effort.
Overclock
Post-Processing Post-rendering AA
(FXAA, TXAA and MLAA/SMAA)
?
Post-rendering scaling
(Sharp bilinear, Lanczos and FSR 1)
?
Filters
AI-powered filter compatible
(Freestyle)
Shader Chain
Inverse tone mapping compatible
Even though Xbox One has no support for HDR, Xbox One X|S and Series X|S systems supports it in some games[1].
TAS features Macros/Scripts/Lua
Rewind
Fast-Forward/Turbo Speed
Savestates
Movie recording/playback
Quality of life Built-in Custom resolution/CRTSwitchRes
For using this on Windows OS you need CRT Emudriver.
Another option is using EDID editor tool such as "Custom Resolution Utility".
N/A
Eighth gen home consoles and beyond only have digital video output anyway.
Streamable compression format
Built-in Graphics mod editor/manager
Built-in Cheat Manager
Per-Game Profiles
Command Line Options
Big Picture Mode
Controls Mouse Injector Compatible
Input lag-mitigating technique
Misc RetroAchievements
EmuVR support Exclusive to libretro cores. So there is no support at the moment.
AI Service
With the help of OCR and other techniques, the AI service can provide a live translation of a game, or text-to-speech capabilities for the visually impaired among other things, either on demand or automatically.
Exclusive to libretro cores at the moment. So there is no support.
Free Look
Free Look is a enhancement feature that allows manipulation of the in-game camera.
While freecam would be technically possible, it will require per-game patches.
Said patches would require a significant amount of time to reverse the game's engine, which means that only someone talented with enough dedication to a single game could do it.
Debug Features
  1. 1.0 1.1 Titles that are backward compatible are supports; AutoHDR, FPS Boost and improved resolution.

Hardware features and peripherals[edit]

Name Xbox Series X/S Xbox One X/S
Dashboard and apps
Achievements
Xbox Live
System Link *
Xbox and Xbox 360 emulation
(Fission)
Kinect
Blu-ray drive
USB Keyboard & Mouse
Xbox One X|S exclusive features
Ultra HD Blu-ray drive Native
Xbox One X|S Enhanced games Native

Dashboard and apps[edit]

Xbox: Experience
tcrf - Xbox One Dashboard Revisions
Wikipedia - List of Xbox One and Series X/S applications

The Dashboard is a graphical user interface developed for Xbox One. You can launch various applications from this interface as well. Also Xbox One supports media streaming (music, photos and videos) with PC using Groove Music and Movies & TV apps.

  • The Xbox One's Dashboard is also used by the Xbox Series X/S, but with a dynamic theme feature and a different home screen[2]. Some apps aren't compatible with Xbox Series X|S though, see this page.

Blu-ray drive[edit]

Xbox One console support for Blu-ray Disc Video and DVD-Video. However it does not have the capability to play HD-DVD and VCDs.

Kinect[edit]

The Kinect sensor and Kinect Adapter have been discontinued. You can still use your Kinect with your Xbox 360, Xbox One or One X|S.

Xbox One X/S[edit]

Xbox One X and Xbox One S
Xbox-One-X&S.jpeg
Developer Microsoft
Type Home video game console
Generation Eighth generation
Release date 2016-7
Discontinued 2020
Predecessor Xbox One
Successor Xbox Series X|S
Emulated

The Xbox One X and Xbox One S are part of the eighth generation of home video game consoles (similar to PlayStation 4 Pro) produced by Microsoft. These consoles are often seen as a mid-gen refresh - sort of an eight-and-a-half generation console. The Xbox One X was released in November 2017 and featured upgraded specifications compared to the original Xbox One, including a more powerful GPU, increased RAM, and support for 4K gaming. The Xbox One S, released the year before in August 2016, offered improvements in design and size, as well as added support for HDR and 4K video playback.

The Xbox One X released with an AMD 8-core APU at 2.3 GHz, 12 GB RAM, and an AMD GPU based on the AMD Radeon RX architecture. It was marketed as the most powerful console on the market at the time of its release in November 2017, with a retail price of $499.

On the other hand, the Xbox One S released with an AMD 8-core APU at 1.75 GHz, 8 GB RAM, and an AMD GPU based on the AMD Radeon GCN architecture. It was marketed as a more affordable option compared to the Xbox One X, with support for 4K video streaming and HDR gaming. The Xbox One S was released with a price tag of $299.

Xbox One X/S exclusive features[edit]

Xbox One X/S Enhanced games[edit]

The Xbox One X and Xbox One S offer enhancements such as improved graphics, higher resolutions, and better performance compared to the original Xbox One.

  • These enhancements are not supported by XBONEmu compatibility layer for emulation.

Ultra HD Blu-ray drive[edit]

Xbox One X|S console support for Blu-ray Disc Video and DVD-Video. However it does not have the capability to play HD-DVD and VCDs. It has Ultra HD Blu-ray drive, so naturally it supports 4K Ultra HD movies too.

  • Series X|S consoles support for Blu-ray Disc Video, DVD-Video and 4K Ultra HD movies.
  • See this dedicated page for more information about home media playback support for emulation softwares.

Emulation issues[edit]

With the Xbox One, Microsoft had two important security goals in mind, to prevent piracy and cheating (these can be seen in the company's Guarding Against Physical Attacks video). To achieve this, much of the hardware was modified to prevent tampering. On the software side, the Xbox One used a new XVD (Xbox Virtual Drive) format to store its operating systems, SystemOS (runs a cut-down version of Windows), HostOS (manages the other two) and GameOS (runs game titles). For the storing of Xbox One titles, the console used another format (XVCs or Xbox Virtual Containers) to store games on Blu-Ray discs. With all this security, it became a challenge to homebrew the console. For technical Xbox One research, see https://xboxoneresearch.github.io/wiki/

It should also be noted that the vast majority of Xbox One games are also available on PC (similar to PlayStation 4 (Pro), PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X|S situations in recent years), so there is increased lack of interest to emulate the console. Having said that, there are still considerable amount of games exclusive to those consoles, this includes games for both PlayStation 4 (Pro) and Xbox One (X|S) that haven't been ported and titles lacking enhanced/next-gen update for PC. See List of notable ports#External_links section for all of those games.

Running UWP apps wihout emulation[edit]

By going to X:\ and copying app files, users could dump a range of system packages such as the Xbox One version of the Microsoft Store. To run these apps, all a user needed to do was to change the application's information file, or AppXManifest from Windows. Xbox to say, Windows.Desktop and certain applications would run but with a lack of input. The same dumping methods probably do not work for important system packages or games, as they are placed in a more secure location and may need compatibility layers to run.

For more information about Xbox One (X|S) system and reverse engineering;

See also[edit]