POS (Pong Consoles) CPUs and Other Chips

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Emulation of common chips is a big part of emulating consoles and computers, this page covers all these well known parts.

x86 CPUs

This part is about software that emulate x86 CPUs, and also other related PC parts.

The PC platform is an open architecture system that IBM initially designed in 1980. IBM's PC 5150 is the progenitor (though in no way representative of iterative designs like the desktops and laptops you may be familiar with today).

The history of the PC is comprehensive, but a good summary is that almost every component of the 5150 was off-the-shelf. IBM hoped that if clones popped up, they could sue them for using the firmware in the BIOS, which they had copyright over as established by a lawsuit between Apple and Franklin.[1] However, Phoenix designed a clean-room replacement firmware based solely on IBM's own public documentation.[2] As a result, IBM never challenged clones that used it and promptly lost control over the platform.[citation needed] Intel would later take up the next major iteration in 1995, called ATX.

Sometime in the 90s, a speedup was found in PC emulation that could run software near-natively; this became the basis for hypervisors, which are different from conventional emulators listed here since they require the host architecture to be at the very least x86-compatible.

Main article: PC Emulator Comparisons
See also Category:x86-based for other x86 based systems software emulation or Windows XP/Vista and Windows 9x for virtualization of these operating systems.

68k CPUs

Wikipedia:Motorola_68000

See Category:68000-based page for m68k-based systems software emulation.

PPC CPUs

Wikipedia:PowerPC

See Category:PowerPC-based page for PPC-based systems software emulation.

ARM CPUs

Wikipedia:ARM_architecture_family

See Category:ARM-based page for ARM-based systems software emulation.

MIPS CPUs

Wikipedia:MIPS_architecture

See Category:MIPS-based page for MIPS-based systems software emulation.

8-bit CPUs

SOC's (System On A Chip)

Model Manufacturer MAME support Emulators / Description
Elan Unknown Decent Designed and Manufactured by an unknown Chinese or Taiwanese company, Elan is one of the older SOC still used in Chinese products, dating back to around the late 90s to early 2000s. Elan is usually used in bootleg or original plug and play games / systems.
SPG243 Sunplus None
SPG250 Sunplus None
SPG288 Sunplus None
SPG289 Sunplus None
SPG293 Sunplus None
VT01 V.R. Technology None NOAC (NES-On-A-Chip) with the ability to drive an STN display directly using a modified palette.
VT02 V.R. Technology None NOAC (NES-On-A-Chip) with major enhancements compared to regular NES. What's new
VT09 V.R. Technology None NOAC (NES-On-A-Chip), a low-cost replacement for VT03.
VT168 V.R. Technology None A MOS6502-based SoC inspired by the NES but unlike NOACs, major differences made it no longer fully backward compatible with NES.
VT268 V.R. Technology None Enhanced VT168.
VT368 V.R. Technology None

CPU's & MP's (Microprocessors)

Model Manufacturer Year MAME support Emulators / Description
80286 Intel 1982 None The 80286 CPU was released on February 1, 1982, with a clock speed of 4 MHz, but it soon changed to 6 MHz. After that, it had a max clock speed of 25 MHz.
386DX Intel 1985 None The 386DX CPU was released in October of 1985 with a clock speed of 12 MHz. The max clock speed was 33 MHz. The 386DX was supposed to be introduced
at 16 MHz, but they had to settle for 12 MHz for technical reasons
386SX Intel 1988 None The 386SX was released in 1988 and was intended for lower-cost home PCs. It has the same clock speeds as the 386DX.
4004 Intel 1971 None The first commercially produced microprocessor.
4040 Intel 1974 None
6800 Motorola 1974 None
68008 Motorola 1979 None
68010 Motorola 1982 None Pin-compatible with the 68000, but not 100% software compatible.
68012 Motorola 1985 None
68020 Motorola 1984 None 32-bit internal and external data and address buses, and natively 32-bit ALU.
68030 Motorola 1987 None 68020 with a memory management unit (MMU) and instruction and data caches of 256 bytes each.
68040 Motorola 1990 None First 680x0 family member with an on-chip Floating-Point Unit (FPU).
68060 Motorola 1994 None Last product in 680x0 family.
8008 Intel 1972 None
80186 Intel 1982 None
80188 Intel 1982 None
80286 Intel 1982 None First x86 processor with memory management and wide protection abilities.
80376 Intel 1989 None
80386 Intel 1985 None First 32-bit x86 processor.
80386DX Intel 1988 None The same as original 80386, just renamed.
80386EX Intel 1994 None
80386SL Intel 1990 None Power efficient version of 80386 for laptops.
80386SX Intel 1988 None Cut down version of 80386 with 16-bit data bus.
8080 Intel 1974 None
8085 Intel 1977 None
8086 Intel 1978 None The 8086 CPU was released on June 8, 1978, at 5 MHz and had a max clock speed of 10 MHz. It was also the beginning of the x86 architecture.
8086-1 Intel 1978 None After the original launch, Intel released the 8086-1, which had a clock speed of 10MHz.
8086-2 Intel 1980 None In May/June of 1980, the 8086-2 at 8 MHz was released.
8086-4 Intel 1978 None The 8086-4 CPU came after the 8086-2 CPU, completely skipping 8086-3; it was clocked at 4 MHz.
8088 Intel 1979 None The 8088 CPU was released on July 1, 1979, and had a default clock speed of 4.77 MHz and a max clock speed of 10 MHz.
AM2900 AMD 1975 None
AM29000 AMD 1975 None
COP400 National Semiconductor 1975 None
i386SL Intel 1990 None The i386SL was released for use in portable computers and had a clock speed of 20 MHz. Its max clock speed is 25 MHz.
i486 Intel 1989 None First x86 chip to include more than one million transistors.
i486DX Intel 1989 None The original i486 without clock multiplier.
i486GX Intel 1994 None Embedded ultra-low-power CPU with all features of the i486SX and 16-bit external data bus.
i486SL Intel 1992 None Low-power version of the i486DX, for laptops.
i486SX Intel 1991 None i486 without FPU.
I8086 Intel 1980 None The last 8086 CPU released was the I8086 in May/June of 1980.
Itanium 2 Intel/HP 2002 None IA-64 instruction set simulator [1] [2], executable toolkit [3]
MC14500B Motorola 1977 None
MC88100 Motorola 1988 None
Pentium Intel 1993 (Original)
1995 (P6)
1997 (MMX)
NA
PIC General Instrument \ Microchip 1975 NA
PowerPC AIM Alliance 1993 NA
RISC IBM 1975 NA
TMS1000 Texas Instruments 1974 None
Z80 Zilog 1976 None
Z8000 Zilog 1979 None
Z80000 Zilog 1986 None

Pong Consoles (Pong In A Chip)

Popular for a few years during the 70s, they came in many kinds of cases, controls, and under many brands but all used a POC (Pong In A Chip) which are chips that contain all and only essential components to run the game of Pong and their variations. And because of this, these chips are emulated rather than individual systems.

Model Year Manufacturer Games/Modes MAME support Other support Latest version ROMs Description
3659-1C/C2566 1975 Atari Pong (Two Player) None Pong Consoles Simulation git
3659-3 1975 Atari Pong (Four Player) None None
AY-3-8500 1976 General Instruments Pong (Four Modes)
Light Gun (Two Modes)
None WinArcadia / AmiArcadia and Pong Consoles Simulation 32.9 git
AY-3-8510 1978 General Instruments NA None WinArcadia / AmiArcadia 32.9 Improved version of the AY-3-8500, games are now in colour
AY-3-8512 1978 General Instruments NA None WinArcadia / AmiArcadia 32.9 Improved version of the AY-3-8510.
AY-3-8550 1976 General Instruments NA None WinArcadia / AmiArcadia 32.9 Improved AY-3-8500 with horizontal player motion
AY-3-8600 1977 General Instruments Pong (Eight Modes) None WinArcadia / AmiArcadia 32.9
AY-3-8601 (Square Off) 1976 General Instruments Combat Squares
Racing Squares
Shooting Squares
Jungle Games (Two Modes)
None There is a possibly that this chip was never released
AY-3-8602 (Volleyball Plus) 1976 General Instruments Volleyball
Protection
Hazard
None There is a possibly that this chip was never released
AY-3-8603 (Roadrace) 1976 General Instruments Racing (Two Modes) None
AY-3-8604 (Barricade) NA General Instruments Snakes None This game is made for two players
AY-3-8605 1977 General Instruments Submarine (Three Modes) None
AY-3-8606 1977 General Instruments Breakout (Ten Modes) None
AY-3-8607 1977 General Instruments Light Gun None
AY-3-8610 1977 General Instruments Pong (Eight Modes)
Light Gun
None Improved version of the AY-3-8600
AY-3-8700 1976 General Instruments Tank Battle None
AY-3-8710 1976 General Instruments Tank Battle None
AY-3-8760 1976 General Instruments Motor Cycle (Four Modes) None
AY-3-8765 1976 General Instruments Motor Cycle (Four Modes) None
AY-3-8800 1976 General Instruments Black Jack
Draw Poker
Acey/Ducey
War
None
AY-3-8888 (Vegas) 1976 General Instruments Black Jack
Slot Machine
None
AY-3-8889 1976 General Instruments Tic-Tac-Toe
LEM (Lunar Landing Module)
None
C010073-01/C2607 1976 Atari Pong (Ten Modes) None
C010073-3 1976 Atari Pong (Four Modes) None Pong Consoles Simulation git
C010765 1977 Atari Pong (Thirty-Two Modes) None
C011500-11 / C011512-05 1977 Atari Pinball/Breakout (Seven Modes) None
CR861 (MUGS) 1977 Signetics Pong
Tank
Helicopter
None There is a possibly that this chip was never released
F4301 1976 Universal
Research Labs
Pong (Two Modes)
Racing (Two Modes)
None
K145ИК17 1980 Angstrem Unknown None A Russian POC, its likely a clone of the AY-3-8500 series. a lot of the IC's made in during the Soviet Union were clones.
M-588135 1982 Motorola None A clone of the Mitsubishi M-588135
M58816P 1977 Mitsubishi / Nintendo None Pong Consoles Simulation git M58816P is a custom chip made by Mitsubishi Electronics for Nintendo, it was used in there Color TV-Game line of console.


this console line was launched in 1977 with the release of the Color TV-Game 6, Nintendo's first console

MM-57100N 1976 National Semiconductor Pong (Three Modes) None This is the NTSC version of the chip.
MM-57105N 1976 National Semiconductor Pong (Three Modes) None This is the PAL version of the chip.
MM-57106N 1977 National Semiconductor Unknown None This is the NTSC version of the chip. There is a possibly that this chip was never released.
MM-57186N 1978 National Semiconductor Unknown None This is the PAL version of the chip. There is a possibly that this chip was never released.
MPS 7600-001 1977 Mostek Pong (Four Modes) None This is the NTSC version of the chip. the games are made for two or four players.
MPS 7601-001 1977 Mostek Pong (Four Modes) None This is the PAL version of the chip. the games are made for two or four players.
SN-76410N 1976 Texas Instruments Pong (Six Modes) None
TMS-1955 1976 Texas Instruments Pong (Four Modes) None
TMS-1965 1976 Texas Instruments Pong (Six Modes) None

External links