Difference between revisions of "Magnavox Odyssey emulators"

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{{Main|Wikipedia:Magnavox Odyssey}}
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{{Infobox console
 
{{Infobox console
 
|title = Magnavox Odyssey
 
|title = Magnavox Odyssey
|logo = Magnavox-Odyssey-Console.jpg
+
|logo = Magnavox-Odyssey-Console.png
 
|developer = Magnavox
 
|developer = Magnavox
|type = [[:Category:Consoles|Home video game console]]
+
|type = [[:Category:Home consoles|Home video game console]]
 
|generation = [[:Category:First-generation consoles|First generation]]
 
|generation = [[:Category:First-generation consoles|First generation]]
 
|release = 1972
 
|release = 1972
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|successor = [[Magnavox Odyssey² emulators|Magnavox Odyssey²]]
 
|successor = [[Magnavox Odyssey² emulators|Magnavox Odyssey²]]
 
|emulated = {{✓}}
 
|emulated = {{✓}}
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}}The '''[[gametech:Magnavox Odyssey|Odyssey]]''' is the first home video game console, released in September of 1972 by Magnavox and was retailed for {{Inflation|USD|99.99|1972}} (though when purchased with a Magnavox television, it cost only {{Inflation|USD|50|1972}}). It was called the '''Brown Box''' during development. It ran on either 6 C-cell batteries or a 9-volt AC adapter. The Odyssey did not use a CPU; the cartridges, called "circuit cards", altered the machine's signal path instead. This changed the light output of the television screen, creating the appearance of a game, but it did not allow for music to be played.
 
}}The '''[[gametech:Magnavox Odyssey|Odyssey]]''' is the first home video game console, released in September of 1972 by Magnavox and was retailed for {{Inflation|USD|99.99|1972}} (though when purchased with a Magnavox television, it cost only {{Inflation|USD|50|1972}}). It was called the '''Brown Box''' during development. It ran on either 6 C-cell batteries or a 9-volt AC adapter. The Odyssey did not use a CPU; the cartridges, called "circuit cards", altered the machine's signal path instead. This changed the light output of the television screen, creating the appearance of a game, but it did not allow for music to be played.
  
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{| class="wikitable" style="text-align:center;"
 
{| class="wikitable" style="text-align:center;"
 
|-
 
|-
|+PC
 
 
! scope="col"|Name
 
! scope="col"|Name
 
! scope="col"|Operating System(s)
 
! scope="col"|Operating System(s)
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! scope="col"|[[Emulation Accuracy|Accuracy]]
 
! scope="col"|[[Emulation Accuracy|Accuracy]]
 
! scope="col"|[[libretro|Libretro Core]]
 
! scope="col"|[[libretro|Libretro Core]]
 +
! scope="col"|<abbr title="Free/Libre and Open-Source Software">FLOSS</abbr>
 
! scope="col"|Active
 
! scope="col"|Active
 
! scope="col"|[[Recommended Emulators|Recommended]]
 
! scope="col"|[[Recommended Emulators|Recommended]]
 +
|-
 +
! colspan="10"|PC / x86
 
|-
 
|-
 
|OdySim
 
|OdySim
 
|align=left|{{Icon|Windows}}
 
|align=left|{{Icon|Windows}}
|[http://odysim.blogspot.fr/ 13/10/2019]
+
|[http://odysim.blogspot.fr 13/10/2019]
||Cycle ||{{✗}} ||{{✓}} ||{{✓}}
+
||Cycle ||{{✗}} ||? ||{{✓}} ||{{✓}}
 
|-
 
|-
 
|}
 
|}
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{| class="wikitable" style="text-align:center;"
 
{| class="wikitable" style="text-align:center;"
 
|-
 
|-
|+PC
 
 
! scope="col"|Name
 
! scope="col"|Name
 
! scope="col"|Operating System(s)
 
! scope="col"|Operating System(s)
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! scope="col"|[[Emulation Accuracy|Accuracy]]
 
! scope="col"|[[Emulation Accuracy|Accuracy]]
 
! scope="col"|[[libretro|Libretro Core]]
 
! scope="col"|[[libretro|Libretro Core]]
 +
! scope="col"|<abbr title="Free/Libre and Open-Source Software">FLOSS</abbr>
 
! scope="col"|Active
 
! scope="col"|Active
 
! scope="col"|[[Recommended Emulators|Recommended]]
 
! scope="col"|[[Recommended Emulators|Recommended]]
 +
|-
 +
! colspan="10"|PC / x86
 
|-
 
|-
 
|Odyemu
 
|Odyemu
 
|align=left|{{Icon|DOS}}
 
|align=left|{{Icon|DOS}}
 
|[http://www.pong-story.com/odyemu.htm 03/03/2009]
 
|[http://www.pong-story.com/odyemu.htm 03/03/2009]
||Cycle ||{{✗}} ||{{✗}} ||{{✓}}
+
||Cycle ||{{✗}} ||? ||{{✗}} ||{{✓}}
 
|-
 
|-
 
|}
 
|}
  
 
[[Category:Consoles]]
 
[[Category:Consoles]]
 +
[[Category:Home consoles]]
 
[[Category:First-generation consoles]]
 
[[Category:First-generation consoles]]

Latest revision as of 16:12, 26 August 2021

Main article: Wikipedia:Magnavox Odyssey
Magnavox Odyssey
Magnavox-Odyssey-Console.png
Developer Magnavox
Type Home video game console
Generation First generation
Release date 1972
Discontinued 1975
Successor Magnavox Odyssey²
Emulated

The Odyssey is the first home video game console, released in September of 1972 by Magnavox and was retailed for $99.99 (though when purchased with a Magnavox television, it cost only $50). It was called the Brown Box during development. It ran on either 6 C-cell batteries or a 9-volt AC adapter. The Odyssey did not use a CPU; the cartridges, called "circuit cards", altered the machine's signal path instead. This changed the light output of the television screen, creating the appearance of a game, but it did not allow for music to be played.

Simulators[edit]

Name Operating System(s) Latest Version Accuracy Libretro Core FLOSS Active Recommended
PC / x86
OdySim Windows 13/10/2019 Cycle ?

Emulators[edit]

Name Operating System(s) Latest Version Accuracy Libretro Core FLOSS Active Recommended
PC / x86
Odyemu MS-DOS 03/03/2009 Cycle ?