Editing Clock Signal

Jump to navigation Jump to search

Warning: You are not logged in. Your IP address will be publicly visible if you make any edits. If you log in or create an account, your edits will be attributed to your username, along with other benefits.

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.
Latest revision Your text
Line 35: Line 35:
 
|}
 
|}
  
==Display emulation==
+
==Display Emulation==
 
[[File:CLK ZX80.gif|right|alt=The emulated display of a ZX80, showing accurate emulation of synchronization issues.]]
 
[[File:CLK ZX80.gif|right|alt=The emulated display of a ZX80, showing accurate emulation of synchronization issues.]]
 
Clock Signal's emulated machines produce a 1d video signal, just as real machines do. Its emulated display, therefore, has to:
 
Clock Signal's emulated machines produce a 1d video signal, just as real machines do. Its emulated display, therefore, has to:
Line 52: Line 52:
 
Composite color is optional for all machines on which it was originally optional. Machines such as the Oric, Electron, and MSX originally shipped with the option of RGB output, so the emulator offers the same.
 
Composite color is optional for all machines on which it was originally optional. Machines such as the Oric, Electron, and MSX originally shipped with the option of RGB output, so the emulator offers the same.
  
==Sound emulation==
+
==Sound Emulation==
 
Sound emulation is generally performed by internal generation of original megahertz-rate audio, which is resampled to the output frequency of the host computer. Therefore just as the video can scale up to modern low-latency high-refresh-rate displays, the audio can scale up to digital output rates such as 96Khz and 192Khz.
 
Sound emulation is generally performed by internal generation of original megahertz-rate audio, which is resampled to the output frequency of the host computer. Therefore just as the video can scale up to modern low-latency high-refresh-rate displays, the audio can scale up to digital output rates such as 96Khz and 192Khz.
  
Line 59: Line 59:
 
That generally allows the emulator to maintain audio latency guarantees completely decoupled from the frame rate. It aims for between 5 and 10ms of audio latency.
 
That generally allows the emulator to maintain audio latency guarantees completely decoupled from the frame rate. It aims for between 5 and 10ms of audio latency.
  
==Host environments==
+
==Host Environments==
 
===macOS===
 
===macOS===
 
For macOS, Clock Signal is a fully-native document model application, which means that the user can simultaneously launch as many different machines as they want, sizing and positioning each independently across multiple displays, arranging their machines into a tabbed interface or performing any other standard Mac windowing actions. It uses Metal for graphics output and is provided as an Intel/Apple Silicon universal binary.
 
For macOS, Clock Signal is a fully-native document model application, which means that the user can simultaneously launch as many different machines as they want, sizing and positioning each independently across multiple displays, arranging their machines into a tabbed interface or performing any other standard Mac windowing actions. It uses Metal for graphics output and is provided as an Intel/Apple Silicon universal binary.

Please note that all contributions to Emulation General Wiki may be edited, altered, or removed by other contributors. If you do not want your writing to be edited mercilessly, then do not submit it here.
You are also promising us that you wrote this yourself, or copied it from a public domain or similar free resource (see Emulation General Wiki:Copyrights for details). Do not submit copyrighted work without permission!

To edit this page, please answer the question that appears below (more info):

Cancel Editing help (opens in new window)